Crimea is (not) Ours

A new documentary by the Civic Solidarity Platform reveals life in Crimea after it was annexed by Russia in 2014.

Crimea is a peninsula in the Black Sea with unique nature and complicated history. As a result of events of February and March 2014 Crimea that used to be Ukrainian became a part of Russia.

Kremlin says it became the result of a lawful will of people of Crimea. Ukraine claims what happened was a military annexation. This point of view is shared by most countries of the world and international organisations, including the UN, Council of Europe and the OSCE.

Many inhabitants of the peninsula welcomed joining Russia. But dozens of thousands of people have fled Crimea, and keep leaving it, including Crimean Tatars and Ukrainians.

How is the peninsula doing? What are its prospects? And whose is Crimea in reality?

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We, members of the Civic Solidarity Platform (CSP), condemn the politically motivated conviction of prominent Crimean Tatar leader Ilmi Umerov and call for his immediate and unconditional acquittal.

The Crimean Human Rights Group have recently conducted a monitoring the access to education in the Ukrainian language in Crimea and Sevastopol. During the research, the following was taken into account: